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on the fateful history which bob is so well chronicled. tom was previously with mortgage guaranty insurance corporation, asset-backed capital research, and wholesale access research and consultancy firm. tom issued early warnings of the increasing risk at fannie mae, about which he was correct, and, of course, ignored. our second discussing, ed pinto is a former executive vice president and chief credit officer of fannie mae, so he's lived in part of his history. as an aei fellow ed has considered groundbreaking research on the contributions of government housing policy for the mortgage crisis. two of his key research papers were submitted to the financial crisis inquiry commission. he is now developing policy considerations, options including countercyclical mortgage policies, an improved understanding of real estate values with appraisals as steps for rebuilding the housing sector. tom, you are first and we're looking forward to your comments. >> good evening. it's a pleasure to be with all of you. my thanks to alex and ed and aei for sponsoring this forum. it's a pleasure to see bob agai
, but the tip of the iceberg on terms of what was on iewfer for -- offer for non-fiction. >> host: bob, same question. >> guest: right. it was a big year for dead presidents. caro's, the fourth of probably five volumes on lyndon johnson, just an incredible act of both reporting and writing about a general figure in 20th century american history. also, goodwin's book "team of rivals," published in 2005 is back on the best seller list thanks to steven spielberg's movie, "lincoln," and on our list, it's number 20, remarkable for a serious book that's been out for so long. also, john's biography of thomas jefferson. just when you think there's no more to be said, someone writes a popular, read readable, somewhat controversial book. >> host: hard to mention dead presidents and not mention "killing lincoln" and "killing kennedy" both best sellers. >> guest: bill and his writing partner, martin. i introduced bill about his process. o'riley says the partner does the research, and he does the writing. he has the idea to write history like a thriller, not in an academicceps. you have to trust him wher
and which bob hagerty will autograph after the program. i am the president fellow at a e. i. and we are pleased to have you with us to consider this fateful history and its role in american politicized housing finance. after many years of dealing with and thinking about fannie mae i thought i knew a lot about this subject but i learned a lot more about it from reading bob's book, especially the very long-term evolution of politicized mortgage finance in this country and also about the vivid personalities involved over the last 40 years, all the way to the end of the story, at least it is the end so far. the book is full of information but in addition if you read my invitation to this event you know i think it represents an underlying tragic drama. in fact a shakespearean tragedy in five's. rise, power, hubris, fall, and other humiliation. on power, many people in washington not so long ago and in the mortgage business everywhere in the country were truly afraid of fannie mae and the retribution it needed out to people who dared to cross it. on hubris, fannie often claiming it was th
marketplace, bob minzesheimer is the book reviewer and reporter for "usa today". sarah weinman, let's start with you. give us your general assessment of 2012 for the book industry especially when a comes to nonfiction books and what are one or two nonfiction books you want to talk about? >> let me start by saying 2012 was a very eventful year in the book publishing world between publishers consolidating the department of justice, doing five publishers and apple on e-book pricing and later into the program, amazon expanding its publishing operations, the google settlement moving forward in different directions. those alone account for a substantial portion of publishing news. on the non-fiction side it was a very strong year. in particular we are seeing a lot of best of 2012 lists dominated by behind the beautiful forevers which was winner of the national book awards. we had robert caro's latest volume in his ongoing biography of lyndon johnson and andrew sullivan's are from the free which was recently published. >> host: hundred page compendium looking at different child-rearing examples of
, none more so than "my american revolution." until i read bob's book i thought i was reasonably conversant for a college graduate of 40 years ago about the american revolution. from what we all know and most massachusetts virginia and the carolinas. in which the heroic continental army barely survived the winter in valley forge pennsylvania. one after the other, bob demolishes these myths and gives a new war centered around lawrence county new jersey aunts -- yes, you heard me right. the mountains 80% of which was fought on a terrain of the empire state-building. truth be told however, as well as admiration i have a grievance with bob. both irish and brightest we both have grievances. i've been hurting deeply disappointed on a personal level that one of bob's books. five years ago in the fall of 2007 i reviewed howe to get rich, the common room magazine and i praised it as quote a profoundly funny book. a year later in the fall of 2008 in the midst of an act of collective subtlety in which the wall street dragged america and the world economy under their funeral pyre i realize s
into this further because i i think this is on c-span and i am still friends with bob. but i was paid an average i think my take-home pay for two weeks was $350 for two weeks. i live with two elderly ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. i had nothing. whenever anybody complains when they're young and they complain about trying to find a job, i go, try living with two old ladies on george mason drive in arlington, virginia. try it. then they invited their older sister to live with them. so there were three. anyway, apparently ronald reagan twice a year goes to people's houses to have dinner. chose to go to my boss' house. so i ago, what do you need quick so of course i'm mowing the lawn and washing the windows. i'm hoping that over time undoing all of this stuff sooner or later he was a greg, you can stick around and meet the president. and sooner or later like days and days of preparation, that's what happened and he asked me. the high point, a couple of high point to meeting ronald reagan. one of them was when the dog sniffing bob's came in and urinated on my boss' briefcase. [lau
] let me ask you, would we have a holocaust with the fault -- really? i wonder. the aforementioned bob said this was in an interview with me a few years ago that in the academy there's a feeling of don't let's be too rude to stalin. he was a bad guy, yes, but the americans were bad guys too and so was the british empire. eric die the, and apologist for communism and stalin. bob, who told the truth about the soviet union won a degree from a university run by, a sadly corrupt president, i believe, who admired bob. that says something about academia and the world. did you see the poster the e.u.? showing all the symbols of europe? it showed a cross, star of david, crescent and so on, and a hammer and cycle. there was a bit -- there's an outcry from the lit wanians, and why aren't we in the west sympathetic enough to the sufferers, the persecutors under communism to subject ourselves? why leave it to these? but there it was. i'm fairly relaxed about the communism symbols. you see a guy with a cccp sweatshirt and his trinkets. i did a study of this, a simple magazine piece, and, you know, t
. bob kill brew told me, tom, you need to learn more about george marshall, so off i went. a couple years later i emerged from the archives. really came to admire the guy. i don't think he's a particularly likable guy. and the other hero, i think, in my book is eisenhower. i think he's actually underrated. the job of managing the allies, of dealing with the british, the french -- >> montgomery was no easy character. >> montgomery's a piece of work. [laughter] you know, at one point they're meeting -- montgomery won't come see marshall, so september 10, 1944 -- i mean, sorry, montgomery won't meet ike. so ike knews up to brussels. he can't get off the plane because he's wrenched his knee, so montgomery comes to see him. pulls out some memorandum can, well, they're sheer rubbish. eventually eisenhower says, steady there, monty, i'm your boss. it's fascinating to me how that difficult relationship with the british as they're realizing that we are replacing them not only in the combat effectiveness, but as a superpower, um, how eisenhower kind of lets them down'sly, manages that -- easi
sarah weinman of "publishers marketplace" and bob minzesheimer of "usa today," we appreciate your time today on booktv. .. >> for complete scheduled visit booktv.org. >> co-founder of freedom fest, one of the largest libertarian conferences in the u.s. talked to book tv about the fast and his book "the making of modern economics." this is about 20 minutes. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. we are on location in las vegas. in annual event organized by this author, mark stousen. tell us to a first of all, what is free of dust and how did talk about? >> a little bit about everything. our renaissance gathering. we have a little bit of everything for everybody. we did a very wide group. we even have an investment conference. wealthy investors, concerned citizens. the focus on political and economic and financial freedom and a strong. we're beer every year with over 2,000 people at this event. ruling. next year will be moving to caesars palace. ethier next year will be, are we round? unthinkable be a good controversial topic. >> sponsored by the libertarian party? >> i hate labels.
a model and an actress and -- i like to do that. my other one that i enjoyed the most was the bob crane story which became a movie autofocus and i went to the nevada desert. i try to keep my word with people, i will quote you write, i take everything. i went back with a suitcase, i had to buy the ticket, it was so heavy, this was a guy who had been murdered. we got a new trial after 17 years, new evidence, it worked extremely well. a fabulous movie. zodiac is on masterpiece and this one started great, william devoe, incredible job and they'll use a portion of my book but i thought i'm the luckiest guy in the world, i do love movies and we got an option for this new book. i can see that. big screen, the city in flames, an incredible felon. i call him the light keeper. i got this idea because back when i was working at the stock room we had a guy coming, must have been 90 and got his picture taken and he was a sea captain and i thought myself he is really nailed it. i was not sure what i wanted to do and i thought look at him. you can feel the salt and everything and i thought that is wha
. >> host: david rothkopf is our guest. bob in marina, california is the next caller. >> it is an honor to talk to you. i met you and some years back at the conference in monterey, california and i remember the educational challenges not only to reach the masses but also to educator the children of the superrich and that the blacks on route nadir at observation the only the superrich can save us. i would like to get an update on your take of the educational challenge we face by your analysis which i think is absolutely superb. you are really a beacon of light in the darkness for us all. >> host: >> guest: education is our biggest challenge, drive economic growth and we have an educational system that works on a model developed at the university of bologna in the year 800 where a guy stands in front of a rule of 800 and talk with them. and into every classroom using video and the internet. we need to recognize and education assistance designed for an agrarian era and give kids the summer of doesn't make sense and an educational system designed for people having one career in their lives
. beginning with bob allison from esa chair of the history department at the university just on this tree. yes it teaches at harvard extension school in a suffered several books on the american revolution, most recently a 2011 book entitled the american revolution, a concise history. he is the vice president of the cornell society massachusetts, trustee of the uss comes to touche museum also in the freedom trail and the commonwealth to see them in boston. he also serves the bostonian society as a member of our board's advisory committee. so with that, bob alice in. [applause] >> next we'll move to jon kyl. john does a curator of the book lost in 1775 from a site dedicated to history, analysis and unabashed gossett asserted the american revolution inkling. recently completed a study in general washington during the siege of the national park service. he saw soviet about doing good count watchman at the boston massacre, the way the encrypt these in 1765 in the towns celebration. ask them about the crazy event annually. he has lectured on many historical societies, including this one. thought --
to him? >> oh, i've never been invited, so i don't know. [laughter] you're right, somebody there was. bob care row, i -- caro, i think. we look a lot alike. [laughter] as i like to say to bob, my guys all died really a long time ago. [laughter] it's a great question. joety cantor, the i think, has been writing on this in the times, and i think -- what i've heard about the obama dinners is, like all presidents, you know, you get behind that desk which is an unparalleled experience. as president kennedy said to david herbert donald one day, the great historian, donald comes in, there's been one of those rankings of presidents come out. kennedy didn't like it, and he said no one -- he pointed at his desk -- he said no one has a right to judge nip, even poor james buchanan who hasn't sat at that desk and seen what he's seen and dealt with what he's dealt with. [laughter] so, and i think there's a lot to that. on the louisiana purchase, the louisiana purchase led to the first really sustained secession thinking and movement in american history which was new england, because new england saw the
the board of bob jones university in 1950. he does it to win votes. bob jones had just moved, just moved his university and thurmond needed votes in south carolina. had lost in 1950 race for the senate to johnson, larger on the strength of votes he didn't win in the up country. that began a long process, a long relationship of thurmond with conservatives fundamentalists and evangelicals who are looking to get involved in the political process. so we need to understand thurmond's racial politics in the mix of these other conservative causes, these conservative issues that he was very involved in. and to see how they intersect with one another. and i think doing so gives us the history of what strom thurmond's america looks like, and else is rethink not only was going on in the south but was going on in the national conservative political realm as well. rethink and strom thurmond helps us think modern conservatism to a history i think that is too often thurmond is left out of because we only remember him as this kind of cartoonish racist figure from the deep south. let me read you, an excerpt
and bob dole never had a child and she said we never had children. i really can't answer. it was kind of an abstract question. the next day the media said she isn't really ready for the campaign trail because she isn't talking like a candidate in the personal and all of a sudden within three weeks, the campaign had kind of folded. i think michael dukakis's problems in terms of the presidential debate when he was asked about what he would do when his wife was raped and he had a very loyal kind of answer, a defense of the opposition to capital punishment in all the sudden we said it does he have a human side. we see into the capabilities and into the character of the individuals. i can get all or was first in the years not just because of the one he sent but because of him being played out out as a serial exaggerate your -- exaggerate her. he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create with the perception of him being in a laboratory setting on the computer and during that. he was very important and became the international legislation, but he had that story, then he h
that is being managed by the real bob sullivan. the genius on the other side of the hudson. let's welcome bob sullivan. >> so, let's cut to the chase. everything san know everything there is to know. >> i am thinking of all the result is ino, and most of them he knew first. there are a lot of our solvents. it might not be me here tonight. thank you so much. we should stop right there. i'm so happy. and also -- >> that's fine. i can read from your book. >> it would be a better night. i know that it would be a better night. when i write books it is how long can you put off not writing the book. i won't write down one. and then a couple of books or ideas keep coming back. there are a lot of them, but i couldn't beat it down. the air about the war. it's foggy. the other project that turns out to be one of my big projects or something is just to look around at the city and look at the landscape. this is a boring work, but to look up where we are. and so to go back to the strategy of the land. >> and serious. the book is an absolute revelation. i thought i knew about the american revolution. to dis
, the 63rd annual. [inaudible conversations] >> now joining us here is bob minzesheimer. i'm going to get you over here. you have the better light. i don't need to worry about that. how important are the national book awards in your view? >> well in the book world? very important. probably not quite as important as the pulitzers, but they're second to the pulitzer's, the most prestigious award, and they're trying to make them more of a cultural phenomenon. look the booker award thursday britain. >> do you comment on the finalists? >> well, i did -- i've always believed -- this is a strange thing. in britain, the bookies -- betting is legal in britain, and bookize set odd on the booker awards. we have nothing like that. and i thought, we should. try to make books more part of the popular culture. so my two predictions -- and i'm guessing because the judges or five people. each panel is five judges. five predictions that kevin powers, who has written a debut novel set in iraq, yellow bird, will be an upset in fiction, and an sold standby, robert caro, who has been on chance many tames, his
, i'd like to ask you the same question that bob asked the two candidates last night which is it snuck by most people. what about a no-fly zone in syria? there's military differences, russian, imported anti-aircraft, so sophisticated things, but the answer that boast romney and obama gave was, no, no military involvement. no-fly zone is a step towards military environment, but not a full military environment. what's your -- way would be your answer to that question? >> well, frankly, i think that the, you know, this is some of the calculation that went into the intervention in libya was if we intervened in syria, we already have done this. that's too flipped, but that's what one -- personally, i, you know, if in that position, i would be in favor of the no-fly zone. i think that -- so would the turks. they are saying, look, you're repeating history over and over here again. >> [inaudible] >> what i think is problematic is offering -- is sending, you know, certain caliber weapons to opposition which we don't know who they are, and that's also repeating a bad precedent. you don't want th
of the success of an nato enforced u.s.-backed no-fly zone in libya , like to ask you this same question that bob asked the two kendis last night which was, it sort of struck by most people. what about a no-fly zone in syria? and there are military differences. russian imported anti aircraft sophisticated things, but the answer that both romney and obama gave was no. no military involvement. the no-fly zone is a stab toward military involvement, but not a full military environment. what would be your answer to a question? >> frankly, this is part -- some of the calculation that went into the intervention in libya was that if we intervene in the rea to libya they're already done this. it makes things -- that's a little bit too flippant. personally if i were in that position i would be in favor of a no-fly zone. i think so with the turks. look, you're doing the same thing. you are repeating history over and over again. and what i think is problematic is sending a certain caliber weapons top position which we don't know exactly who they are. that's also repeating a bad precedent. you don't want thos
what became got which is bob dole got and bush got running for the reelection. that is a fact. and unless we look at the california republican party finding the right individual is going to turn of the largest stake in the country sounds like a serious deep fundamental rethinking now. unfortunately i have been around for so long. i was there for the rebound after goldwater that took a total of four years and i was there for the rebound after watergate that took six years. i was there after george bush lost in '92 which took two years, and i was there after they lost the house and 06 which took four years. so he said to me and my strategically optimistic? sure. the world isn't going to be kind to obama. they will have plenty of mistakes. the challenge is not what they will do wrong. the challenge is whether we are prepared to slow down, think, have honest arguments and figure out what we need to do. if we do that, the country will be just fine. thank you very, very much. [applause] >> from albany new york we hear about the state mandated new york state reuters institute. the pr
representing opposite parties ninteen the lifelong friendship. we can look to john mccain, bob kerrey, chuck hagel, john kerry who despite facing enormous as challenges of war upon returning home, took the lead to normalize relationships in vietnam in helping to heal a wounded nation. it's now our responsibility to uphold the legacy of those who have gone before us. as we in keeping with the mission of united states the united states naval academy assumed the highest responsibilities of command and citizenship in government. thank you very much. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen we are going to make a quick transition in the front of the room to set up for the q&a. by showing a brief video. cue the video. [laughter] if you haven't noticed we have been having a little bit of technical difficulty here today. here we go. ladies and jones meant the video you're you are about to watch is a call to action. we encourage you to buy the book and join the cause. thank you very much. [applause] >> he 9/11. we are prepared to serve in uniform but were not sure how ,-com,-com ma responding to responding
took it as a personal question you could almost see interface to redress that she and bob dole have never had a child. she said we'd never have children. it was really just an abstract kind of question. the next day the media said she's not ready for the campaign trail because she's not talking like a kennedy. she's talking to this person away. all of a sudden within three weeks, her campaign had folded. i think michael dukakis problem in terms of presidential debates that he was asked whether he would do, he gave a lawyerly and their, a defense of his opposition to capital punishment. all of a sudden we said this and this guy have a human side of all? it's one of those things we see into the capabilities of the year of the individual. al gore because those he's been pointed out as the serial exaggerator. any one of those stories you could explain away he'd never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create the internet. and then to have the perception of being in a laboratory and doing it. he was support creative creating the arpanet, but he had that story in a story tha
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22